Sally spreads ‘torrential’ rains over Southeast, Teddy to become major hurricane on way to Bermuda

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A weakened Sally is at risk of flooding in the southeast on Thursday as another storm gathers strength in the Atlantic.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) issued its final notice on Sally early Thursday, saying the center of the storm is near Montgomery, Ala., And winds 30 mph with moving northeast at 12 miles each Hour packs.

“Tropical Depression Sally is still producing heavy rains over eastern Alabama and western and central Georgia,” the NHC said.

2020 ATLANTIC HURRICANE SEASON NAME EXPIRES, WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?

Sally continues to weaken as she moves across the southeast and into the mid-Atlantic before being brought to sea by a cold front on Saturday.

Flood moves in the street in Pensacola, Florida on Wednesday, September 16, 2020. Hurricane Sally landed near Gulf Shores, Alabama on Wednesday as a Category 2 storm, pushing a wave of seawater onto the coast and pouring off pouring rain.
(AP Photo / Gerald Herbert)

Heavy rain, high winds and a few isolated tornadoes are the main risks along the trajectory of this system.

Forecast of precipitation through Friday by Sally.

Forecast of precipitation through Friday by Sally.
(Fox News)

Parts of Georgia can see up to 6 inches of rain, while the Carolinas can see up to 10 inches of rain in some locations.

Flood reports extend through the southeast as Sally migrates inland.

Flood reports extend through the southeast as Sally migrates inland.
(Fox News)

The tornado threat will shift from South Georgia and North Florida to East Georgia and much of the Carolinas on Thursday evening.

Some of the gusts of wind from Hurricane Sally.

Some of the gusts of wind from Hurricane Sally.
(Fox News)

The other storm to watch out for in the Atlantic is Hurricane Teddy, which is now a Category 2 storm with wind speeds of 105 miles per hour and located about 625 miles east-northeast of the Lesser Antilles, according to the NHC.

ALABAMA CHURCH STEPS THAT ARE FILLED AS SALLY TEARS BY MOBILE

Teddy is set to become a major hurricane as it approaches Bermuda this weekend and potentially scores a direct hit.

Hurricane Teddy can be seen over the Atlantic on Thursday, September 17, 2020.

Hurricane Teddy can be seen over the Atlantic on Thursday, September 17, 2020.
(NOAA / GOES-East)

After that, the system could potentially move closer to the US from New England by the end of next week, but for now there are no more storms hitting the US in the next five days.

Forecasting models show that Hurricane Teddy could get closer to New England by next week.

Forecasting models show that Hurricane Teddy could get closer to New England by next week.
(Fox News)

Large waves generated by Teddy are expected to hit the east coast over the weekend, causing life-threatening surf and rip conditions.

Forecasting models show that Hurricane Teddy could get closer to New England by next week.

Forecasting models show that Hurricane Teddy could get closer to New England by next week.
(Fox News)

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The cold front that Sally will be driving off the coast brings much cooler air to the upper Midwest, the Great Lakes and then to the eastern United States this weekend.

The national forecast for September 17, 2020.

The national forecast for September 17, 2020.
(Fox News)

Meanwhile, the west is still on fire, and over 80 major forest fires are burning in the region.

Major forest fires are currently burning in the west.

Major forest fires are currently burning in the west.
(Fox News)

Critical fire conditions also persist in parts of Oregon, Northern California, and the Great Basin.

The fire hazard for Thursday, September 17, 2020.

The fire hazard for Thursday, September 17, 2020.
(Fox News)

Poor air quality and smoke are still widespread throughout the region, which extends into the central United States and even the Northeast.

Air quality in the west is still being affected by ongoing forest fires in the area.

Air quality in the west is still being affected by ongoing forest fires in the area.
(Fox News)

Over the next few days, some moisture will move to the northwest, which will lower temperatures and create the much-needed rain for the region. However, we could also see the risk of stronger thunderstorms as well as some tornadoes.

The smoke from the ongoing forest fires in the west will continue to drift eastwards.

The smoke from the ongoing forest fires in the west will continue to drift eastwards.
(Fox News)

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